IT Certification and Training Blog

NetSim 10.7 Released, Features New TSHOOT Labs

Posted by Kelson Lawrence on May 22, 2015 10:55:00 AM

By James Hanback

If you’re like me, the first thing you want to do when you get your hands on a new toy or technology is to toss the instructions aside and figure out on your own what you can make it do. Sometimes the best way to figure out something new is to find ways to apply it to your existing knowledge or skill set. I remember the first time I tinkered with a Doom level creator way back in the 90s. Without seeking help or tutorials, I immediately started trying to build a Doom-world replica of the interior of my house.

Read More

Tags: James Hanback, NetSim 10.7 Released, Features New TSHOOT Labs

Using Debug to Rid Your Network Configuration of Pests

Posted by Kelson Lawrence on Oct 7, 2014 8:38:00 AM

By James Hanback

Like many other people who live in houses, I have a contract with a pest control company. Now and then, someone arrives at my door wearing a crisp uniform and carrying a giant canister full of some kind of magical chemical concoction. This pest controller uses a long wand that is attached to the canister to conjure up a magic invisible shield that prevents six- or eight- or hundred-legged creatures from invading my space. I know the pest control service is working and worth it when I am not confronted by any tiny crawling, flying, or undulating critters. Thus the debugger who visits my house every now and again does so because I don’t want to see any evidence of bugs in my living space.

Read More

Tags: James Hanback, debug command, passive-interface, debug eigrp packets hello, show cdp neighbors

Time to Fly: IPv6 Demystified Part IV

Posted by Kelson Lawrence on Jul 16, 2014 10:27:00 AM

By James Hanback

Now that you know what an IP version 6 (IPv6) address is, how to identify the types of IPv6 addresses, and how to subnet a block of IPv6 addresses, it’s finally time to configure IPv6 on a network. Perhaps your boss has finally shown some interest and asked you what that whole World IPv6 Launch anniversary you mentioned was all about. Perhaps you’ve simply decided that it’s time to put into practice the topics you’ve been studying in pursuit of your certification. However it happened, you’re ready to implement IPv6 on your network.

Read More

Tags: James Hanback, dual stacks, DHCPv6, ipv6 unicast-routing, tunneling, IPv6, direct route

Take It on the Run: IPv6 Demystified Part III

Posted by Kelson Lawrence on Jun 25, 2014 8:52:00 AM

By James Hanback

As a sensible person, you probably wouldn’t run a 5K, even for charitable purposes, without first performing some type of physical conditioning to ensure that you’ll actually cross that finish line. Whether you’re a professional who just needs to warm up and appropriately hydrate before the race or a newbie who gets out of breath just walking to your car, you’ll most likely prepare yourself with the right equipment and an adequate amount of training before you take on that public run.

Read More

Tags: addresses, subnetting, hexidecimal values, James Hanback, IPv6

Riding the Storm Out: IPv6 Demystified Part II

Posted by Kelson Lawrence on Jun 18, 2014 9:29:00 AM

By James Hanback

The skies overhead are calm and blue. The birds are singing. The world seems to have clicked into place. You now know what an IP version 6 (IPv6) address is and how to format it. No one outside of a certification exam has quizzed you on the particulars of the IPv6 standard, and your boss doesn’t even know how to connect to the Wi-Fi, so it’s time to kick back and bask in the glow of your soon-to-be-certified skills because you know everything you need to know about IPv6.

Read More

Tags: Local Unicast, Anycast, James Hanback, IPv6 Triple Point Address Space, Multicast

Roll with the Changes: IPv6 Demystified Part I

Posted by Kelson Lawrence on Jun 11, 2014 8:25:00 AM

By James Hanback

There might come a time in your career when the fundamental networking tasks you are now able to perform in your sleep, like subnetting an IP version 4 (IPv4) network, fall into obsolescence. Sure, you were warned. We all were. Although IPv4 addressing is far too ubiquitous to go anywhere anytime soon, and the deployment of IP version 6 (IPv6) has been slow, to say the least, more widespread deployment of IPv6 is coming. Therefore, the ability to understand and implement IPv6 addressing has become a topic contemporaneous on network certification exams, such as the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) exam, with the ability to understand and implement IPv4 addressing.

Read More

Tags: James Hanback, IPv6, compare IPv4 and IPv6, shorthand, IPv6 addressing, IPv6 addressing shorthand, composition, compare IPv4 to IPv6

.NET Quest, Part V: Installing Boson Software on a BootCamp Partition

Posted by Kelson Lawrence on Jun 4, 2014 10:09:00 AM

Read More

Tags: James Hanback, .NET Quest Part V, Installing Boson Software on a BootCamp Partition

.NET Quest, Part IV: Installing Boson Software in Oracle VirtualBox

Posted by Kelson Lawrence on Mar 19, 2014 9:04:00 AM

By James Hanback

Very few Sierra On-line adventure games from the 1980s and early 1990s contained the kind of first-person shooter action that would later come to dominate the PC gaming landscape. Mostly, the Sierra adventure gamer had to rely on his or her wits, knowledge, and perhaps the printed manual to piece together the clues that would eventually lead to the game’s solution. Some games, like Police Quest, required some real-life knowledge of police procedure to even get past the parking lot of the fictional Lytton, Calif., police station. Others, like Conquests of Camelot, required some research into arcane flower symbolism (which was helpfully documented in the game’s printed manual, the Liber Ex Doctrina). Similarly, you might find that you need to rely a little more on your own knowledge of your computer hardware to complete this phase of our adventure as we restore our game from the previous three posts and continue our quest to use Boson software in a non-Windows environment.

Read More

Tags: James Hanback, .NET Quest, Part IV: Installing in Oracle VirtualBox

.NET Quest, Part III: Installing Boson Software in Parallels Desktop for Mac

Posted by Kelson Lawrence on Feb 18, 2014 4:19:00 PM

By James Hanback

As 1980s home computing graphics technology improved and paved the way for the early 1990s, so did the animated graphical adventure worlds created by Sierra On-Line grow more detailed and artistically rendered. By the time the first King’s Quest was unleashed upon the world, Color Graphics Adapter (CGA) technology had given way to Enhanced Graphics Adapter (EGA) technology. By the early 1990s, EGA gave way to Video Graphics Array (VGA) technology. More pixels and more colors meant a better level of detail for the gamer. VGA graphics were such an improvement over previous display technologies that Sierra actually rereleased some of its classic games with updated graphics and some modified play. Instead of typing commands to interact with the game, you could use a mouse to select icons or tools that you could apply to the character to make him or her perform actions in the game. However, some gamers—your humble co-adventurer among them—actually preferred the older command interpreter-style play of those first editions.

Read More

Tags: James Hanback, .NET Quest, Mac

.NET Quest, Part II: Installing Boson Software in VMware Fusion

Posted by Kelson Lawrence on Feb 12, 2014 8:50:00 AM

By James Hanback

It probably came as no surprise to the developers of mid-1980s computer role-playing adventure games like King’s Quest that some players might get impatient, frustrated, or just plain stuck while trying to decipher the varied solutions to the puzzles they encountered along the way. In fact, guides to completing such games, known as walk-throughs, became a clever way to make a little bit of additional revenue on the sale of a game. For many games, you could purchase a printed walk-through. Some of them even came with little red cellophane decoders that enabled you to reveal only specific clues to yourself as you followed along, thus allowing you to preserve some of the mystery of playing the game without a guide. Late in the decade, there were also some automated 1-900 hint lines you could call that, for a per-minute fee, would guide you through the particular part of the game that was frustrating you. These days, of course, you can get all the walk-through you need for free on the Internet. Back in 1984, the term Internet had only been around for a couple of years and the world’s first Web browser was still six years away.

Read More

Tags: James Hanback, .NET Quest, Installing Boson in VMware Fusion